March GAP newsletter

March 03, 2020 at 6:00 AM

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Dr. Alex Suquen talks to community members about taking a stand against government injustices. (Photo by Dr. Greg Kuiper)

March GAP newsletter

By Nathan Stob  Nathan short.jpg

PATZUN, GUATEMALA—It is difficult to imagine life without water. No water to wash your clothes or dishes or body. No water to drink or water your crops or feed to your animals.

High in the mountain village of Quisache, Guatemala, outside of Patzun, the people do not have a water source. The rain brings some relief, but mainly they depend on hiking down the mountain to a neighboring village which has dug a well, or they purchase their water from delivery trucks.

Digging a well is possible, but expensive. It involves hiring a specialist to locate where there might be water, then bringing in equipment to drill 40-70 meters into the earth in hopes of hitting water. Villages that have pooled their resources together enjoy easy access to water and also save about a day and a half of wages each week. Drilling sounds like an obvious solution, but is not easy when you are barely making financial ends meet.

Luke Society ministry director, Dr. Axel Suquen, is helping these villages get clean water. He gathers communities together and teaches them how to petition the government for water and about their rights under the law so they can expose government injustice and misspending. Oftentimes this results in the government finishing community wells that have been started years ago.

Pray for Dr. Axel and his staff as they train people how to fight for their rights. Pray for the multifaceted ministry Dr. Axel runs in Patzun, from training in political rights to running a clinic that sees more than 4,000 patients per year to operating a successful pharmacy. Pray for the many Luke Society ministries that work on holistic care, ministering to people physically, mentally and spiritually.

Click the link to read our full March GAP newsletter with updates and prayer requests from around the world.

 

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